Only 5 cities in the world have more than 1 mega airport

With Beijing opening up a new airport last month, the city is taking steps to join a list of cities that have multiple airports handling 50 million or more airline seats in a year. Although it’s not uncommon for cities to have more than 1 airport, there are only 5 cities in the world that have 2 mega airports.

They are (listed in order of routes operated).

  • New York (JFK, EWR)
  • London (LHR, LGW)
  • Bangkok (BKK, DMK)
  • Shanghai (PVG, SHA)
  • Tokyo (HND, NRT)

I had actually entirely forgotten about Bangkok’s second airport, even though I’ve flown out of it before. Also, although initially I didn’t think it was fair to count Newark since it’s technically in another state, EWR is actually only half the distance away from NYC as compared to how far Narita is from downtown Tokyo.

There are a few cities that are close to joining this list, including:

  • Chicago (ORD, MDW)
  • Paris (CDG, ORY)
  • Istanbul (IST, SAW)
  • Seoul (ICN, GMP)

Generally speaking, larger airports tend to have the flagship routes and lounges, although secondary airports can be quieter and easier to navigate. I’d probably prefer the larger airports, although I’m excited to check out ORY for the first time in April

Phoenix Sky Harbor named best large U.S. airport for 2019

The Wall Street Journal just released it’s list of the best and worst U.S. airports for 2019, with Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport receiving the number 1 spot for large airports.

The Wall Street Journal used 15 metrics to determine the rankings, which included operations, dining options, and on-time departures and arrivals.

Rounding out the top 5 are Denver (DEN), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Detroit (DTW), and Orlando (MCO).

The top 5 worst large U.S. airports, ranked in descending order, are Chicago O’Hare (ORD), Miami (MIA), Philadelphia (PHL), New York (JFK), and Newark (EWR). Adding insult to injury for NYC-based travelers, New York LaGuardia (LGA) was ranked as the worst mid-sized airport in the U.S.

What do you think of these rankings? Let me know in the comments!

 

SFO to name terminal after Harvey Milk

San Francisco’s interim mayor, Mark Farrell, signed a bill into law today to officially name the new Terminal 1 at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) after former mayor and gay rights activist Harvey Milk.

According to SFGate, the Harvey Milk Terminal will not be open for a few years — until at least summer of 2019 — as SFO undergoes a $2.4 billion rebuild.

I’m excited for this change and look forward to checking out the new terminal when construction is completed!

Connecting from Terminal 7 to Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX

I found an amazing deal from LAX to Tokyo (Narita) for the cherry blossom festival. There was one “problem,” though – I live in San Francisco.

Having traveled to LAX often, I decided I would book a 7am flight (landing shortly after 8am), which would leave me plenty of time to connect to the Tom Bradley International Terminal (TBIT) at LAX. However, due to what the pilot called “a whole in the runway” at LAX, my flight was delayed and we didn’t land until 10:15am.

Having never traversed from Terminal 7 to TBIT before, and reading horror stories online, I was afraid I would miss my flight.

Luckily, it turns out that you can now connect between all terminals at LAX and TBIT without going through security again. If you land in either Terminal 7 or 8 (basically, United), head to gate 71A and you will see signs leading you to all other terminals.

To make sure I would make it on time, I walked as fast as I could and got a mild case of shin splints.

It took me exactly 20 minutes to travel from Terminal 7 to TBIT, including getting slightly lost once, and arriving at the gate sweating. Of course, my boarding ended up being delayed, but I was happy to make it with plenty of time to spare and am currently awaiting boarding to head to Tokyo!

Airport ride-sharing app Wingz offers free rides to those directly affected by U.S. travel ban

Wingz, a ride-sharing service similar to Uber and Lyft, but which focuses on pre-arranged rides to airports, announced today that it would be offering free rides to those directly affected by America’s new travel ban.

In a statement e-mailed to customers, Wingz said,

“You’ve certainly heard about the recent closure of our borders to the incoming flow of travelers from seven different, predominantly Muslim, countries. One of the fundamental missions at Wingz has always been to create and foster lasting relationships between our riders and drivers, regardless of their faith, values, or nationalities. We at Wingz support the tenants of inclusivity that America was founded upon and want to assist those adversely affected in these precarious times.

That’s why throughout the month of February, we’re offering free rides from airports to those who were directly affected by the travel ban and are now able to re-enter the country (in any market where we offer service). Please contact us directly at ask@wingz.com and we will help you—or someone you know who is impacted—set up a ride home.”

I’ve used Wingz a number of times, and usually get one-way trips to SFO from the city for between $20-31.  Though sometimes more expensive than other ride-sharing apps, it’s convenient to set up a pick-up in advance, and I’ve always had excellent experiences.  Wingz is available at airports around the country, including Austin, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas, and Seattle.

This may have been political and in response to the #DeleteUber trend; but, regardless of their reasons, I think this is ultimately a great gesture.

You can sign up for Wingz using this link.